The latest on Russia sanctions from the International Trade and Supply Chain Team
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On March 13, 2020, the Canadian Parliament approved the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (the “USMCA” in the United States or “CUSMA” in Canada), with Royal Assent, Canada’s equivalent to a U.S. presidential signature, following shortly thereafter.  As a result, Canada became the final of the three countries to approve the revised NAFTA free trade agreement.  Before implementing the USMCA, the member countries must take a number of additional steps including developing uniform regulations, approving the rules of the other countries, and assessing progress toward meeting certain commitments (for example, certain labor courts to be established in Mexico).

After the last party has issued its notification that the necessary additional steps have been completed, the USMCA will replace NAFTA and become effective on the first date of the third month after that notification.  At this time a deadline for such notification has not been set and there is speculation that the process may be slowed by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Husch Blackwell is experienced, working throughout the supply chain to navigate new trade deals. Our trade lawyers are available to discuss these developments and how companies can appropriately prepare for full implementation of the USMCA. Contact Cortney Morgan, Robert Stang or your Husch Blackwell attorney.

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Photo of Robert Stang Robert Stang

Bob focuses his practice on customs and international trade law. He brings 30 years of experience to a wide range of issues that affect inbound and outbound goods, including tariff classification, valuation, country of origin marking matters, free trade agreements, and special trade…

Bob focuses his practice on customs and international trade law. He brings 30 years of experience to a wide range of issues that affect inbound and outbound goods, including tariff classification, valuation, country of origin marking matters, free trade agreements, and special trade programs. He also has extensive customs compliance experience and regularly assists importers facing U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) audits, penalties, seizures, redelivery notices and other agency enforcement activities. Bob works with importers and exporters proactively to achieve cost savings and structure programs that meet CBP “reasonable care” requirements. He also handles supply chain security issues, including Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT) enrollment, verification and annual reviews.

Photo of Julia Banegas Julia Banegas

Julia is an associate in the Washington, DC office of Husch Blackwell. She advises clients doing business in the heavily-regulated Government Contracts and International Trade sectors.

Photo of Cortney Morgan Cortney Morgan

An experienced attorney in the area of international trade and supply chain issues, Cortney advises foreign and domestic clients on all aspects of international trade regulation, planning and compliance, including import (customs), export controls, economic sanctions, embargoes, international trade agreements and preference programs.