Today, the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) passed the U.S. Senate by a vote of 89 to 10.  While some Senators expressed disapproval over the deal for various reasons, passage of the USMCA enjoyed a great deal of bipartisan support after Democrats in the House of Representatives negotiated for more labor enforcement mechanisms that earned the endorsement

White HouseAt a White House ceremony on Wednesday, January 15, 2020, U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese Vice Premier Liu He met to sign Phase 1 of the Trade Deal that has been negotiated since May 2019 in order to end any further escalation in the trade war between the two countries.  The agreement consists of

As we kick off a new year, Husch Blackwell’s International Trade and Supply Chain team offers an analysis of events that shaped the international trade landscape in 2019 as well as insight into what international trade issues are on the horizon in 2020 in a recently published white paper.

The “International Trade Law: 2019

The U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (“the USMCA”) passed the U.S. House of Representatives on December 19, 2019, by a vote of 385 to 41.  In order to be fully ratified by the United States, the USMCA must now be approved by the U.S. Senate, which has a total of up to 30 session days after the House

After a long period of negotiation, Vice Minister Wang Shouwen of China’s Commerce Ministry announced on December 13, 2019 that the U.S. and China have agreed to “phase one” of an agreement to bring an end to the trade war that has disrupted global supply chains since 2018. China’s confirmation came after President Trump approved

On December 10, 2019, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi stated in a press conference that Democrats had reached an agreement with the Trump Administration on the new U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (“USMCA”) intended as a NAFTA update, clearing the way for Congress to vote on the trade agreement.  Speaker Pelosi called the agreement “a victory for America’s workers”

White HouseAt a NATO meeting on Tuesday, December 3, 2019, President Trump declared that he was prepared to wait to negotiate a trade agreement with China until after the 2020 U.S. presidential election, dashing hopes that “phase one” of an interim agreement was to be reached soon.  The 15% Section 301 List 4b tariffs are likely

President Trump unexpectedly announced via Twitter on Monday, December 02, 2019 that the 25% Section 232 steel and aluminum tariffs that were enforced globally in 2018 would be reinstated on imports from Argentina and Brazil, claiming that a “massive devaluation” of the countries’ currencies has given them an unfair trade advantage.  Like Canada and Mexico,

On November 26, 2019, the United States Trade Representative (“USTR”) issued another round of product exclusions pertaining to the 25% Section 301 List 3 Tariffs. The new list of exclusions includes 32 specifically crafted product descriptions that cover 39 separate exclusion requests. To see the full list of products click here. According to the

Doubts over the progress of negotiations between the U.S. and China have been raised today as President Trump announced that the U.S. has not agreed to roll back tariffs as part of an agreement to end the trade dispute, contradicting statements from China’s Ministry of Commerce and several news reports. Based on recent news reports,