International Trade & Supply Chain

On December 6, 2019, Commerce announced in the Federal Register the opportunity to request an annual administrative review for products that are currently subject to antidumping and countervailing duties.  As part of this annual review process Commerce intends to select respondents based on U.S. Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) data for U.S. imports during the

White HouseAt a NATO meeting on Tuesday, December 3, 2019, President Trump declared that he was prepared to wait to negotiate a trade agreement with China until after the 2020 U.S. presidential election, dashing hopes that “phase one” of an interim agreement was to be reached soon.  The 15% Section 301 List 4b tariffs are likely

In Husch Blackwell’s November 2019 Trade Law Newsletter, you’ll learn about the following updates in international trade and supply chain law.

  • USTR Announces New Round of Product Exclusions
  • U.S.-China Trade Dispute Status Update
  • WTO Authorizes China to Impose Tariffs against U.S.
  • An update on U.S. Department of Commerce decisions
  • U.S. International Trade Commission –

President Trump unexpectedly announced via Twitter on Monday, December 02, 2019 that the 25% Section 232 steel and aluminum tariffs that were enforced globally in 2018 would be reinstated on imports from Argentina and Brazil, claiming that a “massive devaluation” of the countries’ currencies has given them an unfair trade advantage.  Like Canada and Mexico,

On November 26, 2019, the United States Trade Representative (“USTR”) issued another round of product exclusions pertaining to the 25% Section 301 List 3 Tariffs. The new list of exclusions includes 32 specifically crafted product descriptions that cover 39 separate exclusion requests. To see the full list of products click here. According to the

Doubts over the progress of negotiations between the U.S. and China have been raised today as President Trump announced that the U.S. has not agreed to roll back tariffs as part of an agreement to end the trade dispute, contradicting statements from China’s Ministry of Commerce and several news reports. Based on recent news reports,

On November 1, 2019, Commerce announced in the Federal Register the opportunity to request an annual administrative review for products that are currently subject to antidumping and countervailing duties.  As part of this annual review process Commerce intends to select respondents based on U.S. Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) data for U.S. imports during the

In Husch Blackwell’s October 2019 Trade Law Newsletter, you’ll learn about the following updates in international trade and supply chain law.

  • The current and future status of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada agreement
  • Opening Day, start date and new list of excluded products for Section 301 List 4 exclusion process
  • ITC opens MTB process; petitions due by

For the first time since China gained membership in 2001, the World Trade Organization (WTO) on November 1, 2019 authorized China to impose $3.6 billion worth of punitive and retaliatory tariffs on American imports.  The WTO ruled that U.S. antidumping duties on imports of Chinese steel were overinflated because the methodologies used by the U.S.

The process for filing exclusion requests for products on the Section 301 List 4  begins today, October 31, 2019 and ends on January 31, 2020 The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (“USTR”) published the exclusion request procedures in the Federal Register on October 24, 2019.

Exclusion requests can be submitted via USTR’s portal