The U.S.-Mexico-Canada Free Trade Agreement (USMCA) will displace NAFTA and become effective July 1, 2020. Though similar to NAFTA in many ways, key changes in the USMCA include provisions for digital trade, implementation of new local labor standards in the automotive sector, and the adjustment of the rules of origin for a wide variety of

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (“USTR”) released the final implementing regulations of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (“USMCA”) on June 3, 2020, an important step for when the USMCA goes into effect on July 1, 2020. The implementing regulations cover the interpretation, application, and administration of the rules of origin, textile and apparel

On April 24, 2020, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer notified Congress that Mexico and Canada had taken the necessary additional measures to comply with their commitments under the United States–Mexico–Canada Agreement (USMCA).  The U.S. also notified the governments of Mexico and Canada that the U.S. had completed its domestic procedures to implement the USMCA.  Mexico

In Husch Blackwell’s March 2020 Trade Law Newsletter, you’ll learn about the following updates in international trade and supply chain law:

  • CBP Changes Course: No Longer Accepting Requests to Defer Duty Payments
  • CBP Announces that Importers of Garlic and Pipe Fittings are Evading AD and CVD Duties
  • Court of International Trade Assigns 3-Judge Panel

On March 13, 2020, the Canadian Parliament approved the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (the “USMCA” in the United States or “CUSMA” in Canada), with Royal Assent, Canada’s equivalent to a U.S. presidential signature, following shortly thereafter.  As a result, Canada became the final of the three countries to approve the revised NAFTA free trade agreement.  Before implementing

President Trump signed the implementing legislation for the USMCA yesterday, making the United States the second of the three countries, after Mexico last December, to sign the agreement.  The USMCA will not take effect until 90 days after it is ratified by Canada. The Liberals currently operate a minority government, and while the Conservatives have

Today, the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) passed the U.S. Senate by a vote of 89 to 10.  While some Senators expressed disapproval over the deal for various reasons, passage of the USMCA enjoyed a great deal of bipartisan support after Democrats in the House of Representatives negotiated for more labor enforcement mechanisms that earned the endorsement

The U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (“the USMCA”) passed the U.S. House of Representatives on December 19, 2019, by a vote of 385 to 41.  In order to be fully ratified by the United States, the USMCA must now be approved by the U.S. Senate, which has a total of up to 30 session days after the House

On December 10, 2019, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi stated in a press conference that Democrats had reached an agreement with the Trump Administration on the new U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (“USMCA”) intended as a NAFTA update, clearing the way for Congress to vote on the trade agreement.  Speaker Pelosi called the agreement “a victory for America’s workers”

U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Robert Lighthizer and certain officials in the administration have expressed optimism about the future of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada

On October 23, 2019, Senator Grassley, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, stated that he had a “growing worry” about the current progress of USMCA and claimed that the Democrats are stalling in the