Doubts over the progress of negotiations between the U.S. and China have been raised today as President Trump announced that the U.S. has not agreed to roll back tariffs as part of an agreement to end the trade dispute, contradicting statements from China’s Ministry of Commerce and several news reports. Based on recent news reports,

For the first time since China gained membership in 2001, the World Trade Organization (WTO) on November 1, 2019 authorized China to impose $3.6 billion worth of punitive and retaliatory tariffs on American imports.  The WTO ruled that U.S. antidumping duties on imports of Chinese steel were overinflated because the methodologies used by the U.S.

The process for filing exclusion requests for products on the Section 301 List 4  begins today, October 31, 2019 and ends on January 31, 2020 The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (“USTR”) published the exclusion request procedures in the Federal Register on October 24, 2019.

Exclusion requests can be submitted via USTR’s portal

On October 24, 2019, the Office of the United States Trade Representative (“USTR”) granted exclusions for 83 specific HTS numbers which are currently subject to 25 percent Section 301 tariffs under List 3. The product exclusions apply retroactively effective September 24, 2018 until August 7, 2020. To see a full list of the excluded products,

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (“USTR”) announced that starting on October 31, 2019, the exclusion process for Chinese imports subject to List 4 Section 301 tariffs of 15% will open and will conclude on January 31, 2020.

Details on the specifics of the application process are to be published in the Federal Register

The U.S. is set to levy 25% tariffs on imports of specified European foods in response to the World Trade Organization’s (“WTO”) decision on October 2, 2019, that the European Union (E.U.) provided subsidies to Airbus at the expense of Boeing and the United States. These new tariffs will affect approximately $7.5 billion beginning today,

The U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) announced on October 11, 2019 the opening of its system for accepting petitions for tariff relief under the American Competitiveness Act of 2016 (commonly referred to as the Miscellaneous Tariff Bill or MTB).  The MTB allows U.S. importers to petition for duty-free or reduced-duty treatment of imported products that

On Wednesday, September 11, 2019, President Donald Trump posed an unexpected tweet that the United States would be delaying the implementation of the tariff increase from October 1, 2019 to October 15, 2019 as a “gesture of good will” towards China. Originally, President Trump had planned to increase the current 25% tariff rate on $250

On August 23, 2019, President Trump announced via Twitter that the tariff rates on Lists 1, 2, and 3, worth approximately $250 billion worth of goods imported from China, will increase from 25% duty to 30% beginning October 1, 2019. Additionally, the President indicated that the tariff rate on the List 4 tariffs currently set to begin on September 1 will increase to 15% from 10%. It is unclear if the tariffs currently set to go into effect on December 15 will also be increased to 15%.
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USTR Proposes New Tariffs on EU Products under Section 301

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) announced on July 1, 2019 a proposed list of tariffs on approximately $4 billion worth of products from the European Union (EU). This is a supplemental list to the April 12, 2019 proposed tariffs with an approximate trade value of $12 billion.

According to USTR, this action is designed to pressure the EU to implement the World Trade Organization’s (WTO) Dispute Settlement Body recommendations in regard to the United States’ WTO dispute against the EU’s subsidies on large civil aircraft.

Interested parties can appear at a public hearing or file comments on the proposed list.
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