On October 14, 2019, President Trump announced via Twitter his intention to authorize sanctions against Turkey and “any persons contributing to Turkey’s destabilizing actions in northeast Syria.” The announcement followed Turkey’s recent military operation against predominately Kurdish forces in northern Syria, which began following the withdrawal of U.S. troops from the region. Later in the day, President Trump issued an Executive Order (the “Syria-Turkey EO”) to formally implement those sanctions. Under the Syria-Turkey EO:

  • The U.S. Secretary of the Treasury is now authorized to impose blocking sanctions on any person that it determines to be: (i) responsible for or complicit in actions that threaten Syrian stability or abuse human rights, (ii) an official or agency of the Government of Turkey, or (iii) operating in sectors of the Turkish economy that the Secretary of Treasury might later decide to target with sanctions. The Syria-Turkey EO also authorizes the Treasury Secretary to impose blocking sanctions on any person (including non-U.S. persons) who provides material assistance, goods or services to or in support of any person sanctioned under the Syria-Turkey EO.
  • The U.S. Secretary of the Treasury is authorized to restrict or prohibit foreign financial institutions from opening or maintaining correspondent or payable through accounts in the U.S. if the Treasury Department determines that those foreign financial institutions have knowingly conducted or facilitated any significant financial transaction for or on behalf of any person who becomes subject to the above-described blocking sanctions.
  • The U.S. Secretary of State is now authorized to impose menu-based sanctions on any person the Secretary determines to have interfered with peacekeeping and restorative efforts in northern Syria. These authorized menu-based sanctions include (but are not limited to): blocking sanctions, denial of U.S. entry visas and financing-based sanctions.


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Investigations

  • Certain Steel Wheels 12 to 16.5 Inches in Diameter from the People’s Republic of China: On July 9, 2019, Commerce released the final affirmative Antidumping Duty and Countervailing Duty determinations and final affirmative determinations of Critical Circumstances.
  • Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof: On July 16, 2019, Commerce released its final determination of Anti-Circumvention Inquiry.
  • Certain Steel Racks and Parts Thereof from the People’s: On July 24, 2019, Commerce released the final affirmative Countervailing Duty determination and Antidumping Duty determination.
  • Glycine from the People’s Republic of China: On July 25, 2019, Commerce released a notice of correction to the final affirmative Countervailing Duty determination and Countervailing Duty Order.


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Investigations

  • Certain Steel Nails from the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: On June 19, 2019, Commerce released a notice of its Final Scope Ruling and notice of the Amended Final Scope Ruling in the Antidumping and Countervailing duty orders of the subject merchandise.
  • Steel Propane Cylinders: On June 21, 2019, Commerce announced its final determinations in the Antidumping Duty Investigations for the People’s Republic of China and Thailand.
  • Steel Propane Cylinders from the People’s Republic of China: On June 21, 2019, Commerce released the final affirmative Countervailing Duty determination.
  • Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings from the People’s Republic of China: On June 21, 2019, Commerce issued the final affirmative determination of Circumvention of the Antidumping Duty Order.
  • Glycine from India and Japan: On June 21, 2019, Commerce released the amended final affirmative Antidumping Duty determination.  


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Investigations

  • Glycine from India: On May 1, 2019, Commerce released its final determinations for both the Antidumping Duty and Countervailing Duty Investigation.
  • Glycine from the People’s Republic of China: On May 1, 2019, Commerce released its final affirmative Countervailing Duty determination.
  • Glycine from Japan: On May 1, 2019, Commerce issued its final Antidumping Duty determination.
  • Large Diameter Welded Pipe: On May 2, 2019, Commerce issued an amended final affirmative antidumping determination and antidumping duty order to the following countries: Greece
  • Turkey
  • Republic of Korea
  • Certain Quartz Surface Products from the People’s Republic of China: On May 23, 2019, Commerce released both the final affirmative Countervailing Duty and final affirmative Antidumping Duty determinations.


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USTR Publishes Notice on Increase in Section 301 List 3 Tariff Rate

On May 8, 2019, USTR released its federal register notice on the tariff increase for the third tranche (List 3) Section 301 tariffs on China. The duty rate on the estimated $200 billion worth of Chinese products will increase from 10% to 25% effective 12:01am ET on Friday, May 10, 2019. The notice also announces that an exclusion process will be instituted for these products in a separate notice.

The rate increase to 25% means that entries of goods

  1. entered for consumption, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or after 12:01 a.m. eastern daylight time on May 10, 2019, and
  2. exported to the United States on or after May 10, 2019 will now be subject to an additional tariff of 25%. Entries must be subject to both qualifiers-meaning that if a shipment has been exported prior to May 10, 2019 it will still be subject to the 10% duty rate.  However, if the shipment is exported after 12:01am ET on May 10 the 25% duty rate will apply. To see our full post, click here.


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Court of International Trade

Summary of Decisions

19-41

On April 1, 2019, the CIT sustained and further remanded Commerce’s remand redetermination in the 2014-2015 administrative review of the antidumping duty order on welded carbon steel standard pipe and tube products from Turkey. Commerce’s action on remand negated the statutory drawback adjustment that Plaintiff Toscelik earned by exporting its finished product to the United States and impinges on the agency’s ability to make a fair comparison. Commerce reasonably relied on Plaintff Toscelik’s questionnaire responses and concluded that Commerce’s grant of circumstances of sale adjustment was supported by substantial evidence.
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U.S. International Trade Commission

Section 701/731 Proceedings

Investigations
  • Certain Pasta from Italy and Turkey: On April 10, 2019, the ITC announced its determination that the revocation on certain pasta from Italy and Turkey would lead to the continuation or recurrence of material injury to an industry in the United States.
  • Cast Iron Soil Pipe from the People’s Republic of China: On April 12, 2019, the ITC announced its final determinations in the AD and CVD investigation that industries in the US would be materially injured by the importation of the subject merchandise.
  • Larges Diameter Welded Pipe from Canada, Greece, Korea, and Turkey: On April 19, 2019, the ITC announced its final determination that an industry in the United States is materially injured by the importation of the subject merchandise.
  • Steel Propane Cylinders from China and Thailand: On April 29, 2019, the ITC issued a revised schedule of the final Phase of the Countervailing Duty and Anti-Dumping Duty Investigations.
  • Certain Large Residential Washers from Korea and Mexico: On April 30, 2019, the ITC released its final determinations on whether or not the continuation of the subject merchandise from these countries would continue to cause material injury in the United States.


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